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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:15 am 
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Joined: Mon Aug 08, 2016 7:23 am
Posts: 2383
Location: Somewheres near the Atlantic
I came across this and has some good tips for indoor shooters. Might be a bit more concerning if you have young kids and carpet. Since youths, retain more lead then adults.

Give this a read.

https://www.usashooting.org/library/You ... SASCMP.pdf

I got my blood test back, If I didn't take 4 months of shooting PB and didn't cast. I would be the next level of lead level, that I would be told to stop exposing myself to lead. And might have to consider chelation therapy.

I shoot firearms every week at a indoor range, smelted a bit ( but wore proper PPE ) and shoot airgun semi daily.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:26 am 
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Location: GTA, ON
A quick read through the article, looks even the competitors or shooting team members who handle much more lead pellets daily than us normal ppl take the airgun shooting as just a hobby don't have related health issue caused by handling lead, we don't need to worry about too much.

Just the basic line, lead is toxic, wash hands before and after, don't eat it... And take an extra care on the young shooters ~

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HW35 Walnut + Hawke 40mm Scope
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 9:54 am 
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Location: Somewheres near the Atlantic
YepYep wrote:
A quick read through the article, looks even the competitors or shooting team members who handle much more lead pellets daily than us normal ppl take the airgun shooting as just a hobby don't have related health issue caused by handling lead, we don't need to worry about too much.

Just the basic line, lead is toxic, wash hands before and after, don't eat it... And take an extra care on the young shooters ~

Sent from my LG cellphone


You know washing your hand does nothing really? Because most will wash with hot water, thus opening their pours and allowing it into their blood stream. Plus most soaps don't do nothing for detoxing, or removing the lead. There are special soaps and wipes. You think hands are clean with regular soap...? NOPE.

6 of us test elevated/high for lead levels. One went all doctor on us, and went heavy into the researching. I didn't care till I started to get some illnesses.

Also if you shoot and got carpet. everytime you vacuum, you can make it airborne. Why at the range we don't sweep without dust bane, manly clean up with a hose and squeegie. And removed all carpet. Esp those who shoot at shooting ranges.

But can apply to at home too.. And you said, don't need to worry.. Well lead doesn't go away, it will build up and up, till it becomes a problem. If you got young kids and play on the flooring you shoot on. They are more subject to retaining lead.

Since one article I read, a youth will retain 50% of the lead, where an adult will retain 10%


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:09 am 
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Location: Near Montreal, Quebec
Leadslinger ,
Thank you Robert for Posting all this.
It is very informative and trustworthy information for ALL OF US airgunners..especially pellets shooters.
I agree this should likely not be taken too lightly...just because 'it is a hobby'.
I sort my pellets with a PelletGage thus handle them quite a bit even before ever shooting them. I have a hygienic routine: first wipe hands with towelets that have alcohol...followed by strong soap washing/scrubbing to get the remaining black residue (lead ?) from hands.

Might I humbly suggest that this be put in here as a 'sticky'. Seems to me, discerning information for both 'experienced' as well as 'newbies' to airgunning with lead pellets would be valuable and useful addition to the Forum.

Hawk-i

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:33 am 
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Location: Somewheres near the Atlantic
And this is what we brought up to our range. If adults are getting high levels. What are the youth that shooting 22, archery and other youth program, using the same facility as we do? Since they are more subject to retention.

Now I'm curious what just a pellet gun shooter BLL is?

https://ocfp.on.ca/docs/committee-docum ... D5TpC3-8X0

Because when I shot airgun/rifle for the cadet rifle team, I remember no safety warnings and such about handling, or the risk. Just don't eat it.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:42 am 
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Location: Kingston
From the OP posted article:
USOC-monitored blood lead-level testing is routinely required and conducted. This test-ing has never detected a single case of elevated lead levels that required medical intervention among athletes in the program. In fact, most athletes in these tests had lead levels well below the lead levels found in the general population.

Don't lick your pellets and your hands and you have nothing to worry about.
If you are smelting lead in your home or improvised conditions that's another story.

Bottom line, we are not likely to have lead poisoning from target hunting or shooting. If you have elevated lead, it's from something else.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 10:56 am 
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Location: GTA, ON
My hand wash after shooting is usually very quick... I rub my two finger tips that touched the pellets on running water... And it looks very easy to get rid of the black color... Usually before the hot water comes in, I can finish.... Then use a towel to rub dry...

Isn't that enough? Don't know where to buy the special soap etc...

Sent from my LG cellphone

_________________
Izzy 46M
HW30 Stainless Steel + Discovery 40mm Scope
HW35 Walnut + Hawke 40mm Scope
2240+14" barrel/Williams peep sight
Daisy 953 + Hawke 40mm Scope
P3+2x20 Kit Scope
HW40+Extender
HW45+Grip panels from Russia
P1322 with walnut forearm


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:27 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 08, 2019 2:51 pm
Posts: 15
Location: QC
Thanks for posting that very interesting document!
I'm always worried when cleaning my trap as the fabric that I use to prevent the pellets from shattering on the steel backplate seem to have quite a bit of dark residue on it. Even if the document is reassuring, I'm going to start using a mask and gloves for cleaning and try thin gloves for shooting (I really dislike how dirty my fingers get from handling pellets, regardless of health concerns).


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:36 pm 
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Location: Somewheres near the Atlantic
YepYep wrote:
My hand wash after shooting is usually very quick... I rub my two finger tips that touched the pellets on running water... And it looks very easy to get rid of the black color... Usually before the hot water comes in, I can finish.... Then use a towel to rub dry...

Isn't that enough? Don't know where to buy the special soap etc...

Sent from my LG cellphone


CDC says NO.

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/lead/safe.html

Quote:
Hand washing with standard soap and water is not effective at removing lead residue from hands. NIOSH researchers have developed wipes that can remove 98% of lead residues from skin. ... Shower and change your clothes and shoes after working around lead-based products.


Here what the CDC says about lead. Check out the pull down menu on the left.

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/lead/default.html


Quote:
You can be exposed by coming in contact with lead dust.

Some studies have found lead can be absorbed through skin. 1 If you handle lead and then touch your eyes, nose, or mouth, you could be exposed. Lead dust can also get on your clothes and your hair. If this happens, it’s possible that you may track home some of the lead dust, which may also expose your family.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:51 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2011 3:08 pm
Posts: 857
Location: port colborne. ontario.
I just wanted to throw this in. before copper lines used to supply houses with water most of them used to be lead and a lot still are. I worked in construction in water and sewer and we were hired by the city to change the old lead lines that they knew about over to copper. before there was all this bottled water that's all people drank water from was the tap supplied by lead water lines.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 2:17 pm 
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Location: Meaford, Ont.
pete wrote:
I just wanted to throw this in. before copper lines used to supply houses with water most of them used to be lead and a lot still are. I worked in construction in water and sewer and we were hired by the city to change the old lead lines that they knew about over to copper. before there was all this bottled water that's all people drank water from was the tap supplied by lead water lines.

And lead paint on the glass you drank it from. :wink:


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 3:44 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2017 7:01 pm
Posts: 1489
Location: GTA, ON
found this from Amazon... Good?!Image

Sent from my LG cellphone

_________________
Izzy 46M
HW30 Stainless Steel + Discovery 40mm Scope
HW35 Walnut + Hawke 40mm Scope
2240+14" barrel/Williams peep sight
Daisy 953 + Hawke 40mm Scope
P3+2x20 Kit Scope
HW40+Extender
HW45+Grip panels from Russia
P1322 with walnut forearm


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 7:49 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 01, 2018 8:01 pm
Posts: 175
Location: Klowntown BC
wheeliehd wrote:
pete wrote:
..people drank water from was the tap supplied by lead water lines.

And lead paint on the glass you drank it from. :wink:

..and the lead in the paint on my baby crib. (think 1958)


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 2:10 am 
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Joined: Sat Jun 18, 2016 1:06 pm
Posts: 162
Location: Yukon
Good post leadslinger, never a bad time to review this information. Thanks


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 12, 2019 2:46 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 16, 2013 5:15 am
Posts: 3344
Location: Edmonton
Page 13.

WHAT CONCLUSIONS WERE REACHED AS A RESULT OF
LEAD TESTS DESCRIBED IN THIS BOOKLET?

 There is no scientific evidence that firing lead projectiles
in target airguns with velocities of less than 600 fps. gen-
erates any detectable airborne lead.

 There is no medical evidence that shooters who handle
lead pellets in accordance with established hygiene pro-
cedures, will develop elevated lead levels that require
medical intervention.

 Anyone who handles lead pellets during air rifle or air pis-
tol shooting can effectively minimize their lead exposure
by washing their hands after firing and by not consuming
food materials on the range.

 Lead residues are deposited on the floors of air gun
ranges in the area between the firing line and the target,
but the proper management of downrange movement by
range officials and shooters and the employment of prop-
er range cleaning procedures effectively minimizes any
health risks associated with these lead residues.

 Pellet traps that do the best job of capturing and hold-
ing spent pellets and pellet fragments must be used. Only
adult supervisors who take proper precautions should
handle lead pellet residues that are collected in pellet
traps after firing.


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