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PostPosted: Fri Jun 26, 2020 10:31 am 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
I recently posted a pic of my full power .177cal Crosman Fury NP and an observant friend noticed that the barrel appeared bent so he sent a PM. This got me thinking about how much work went into this messed up rifle. Here goes the long tale for your entertainment....

The rifle was originally purchased a few years ago by generous forum member ricksplace. It was a refurb rifle from Airgun Depot in the USA. The refurb rifles are about half the price but you don't really know the details until you get to open the package. The rifles are even stamped as "refurbished" so every owner is aware.

Rick is a very handy tinkering kind-of-guy and spent many hours working on this troublesome rifle. He eventually decided the rifle was not for him and was plagued with too many issues. It already ate a couple of his scopes. He gave it to me as a project with a warning to not get too frustrated. Here is all that was done to this challenging rifle.

Barrel - It shot quite high due to an upbend at the breech block. No drooper mounts would fix this amount of damage. The easiest solution was to bend the barrel downwards so Rick somehow got it bent in the middle and achieved the proper amount of bend. It looks a bit strange but works perfect this way. The barrel has an upbend at the block and then a downbend halfway. The pellets gets a roller-coaster ride down the tube but it shoots fine. A bend at the breech-block would have been very difficult.

Cocking linkage - The upward bent barrel caused the cocking linkage to rub heavily on the bottom of the receiver tube. Possibly the block was also angled slightly upwards. Rick filed off some material on the top of the linkage and reduced the roller diameter. The procedure worked. No more rubbing or metal grinding!

Trigger - Most Crosman break-barrels are not know for great triggers. Rick worked this trigger so it feels like something on a target rifle. Crisp, light and predictable. I left it alone and appreciate the effort.

Stock screw - With all the disassembly/assembly on this rifle the front receiver screw hole was finally stripped. No problem for Rick. He slightly enlarged the hole, tapped it out and made a new screw that worked perfectly.

Bedding - Rick is quite the experimenter. The entire metal-to-stock contact area was soft bedded with neoprene to help absorb so of the vibration. It fits tight but this stubborn rifle still refused to shoot accurately.

Barrel crown - Rick had recrowned the barrel and did a great job. The rifle was shooting poorly when he donated it so I polished up the crown a second time as a just-in-case thing. Drill, brass screws, jeweler's rouge, JB paste. It still gave poor accuracy!

Receiver tube - I spent some time with this rifle on the chronograph. After only a few weeks I noticed that the velocity was decreasing. It was down over 100fps and I suspected the strut was leaking. Disassembly showed the piston seal was getting sanded down on one side. The tube was rough inside so I made a hone and polished it out. The piston was also polished. A new seal was installed and that issue was now fixed.

Barrel rifling - The rifle still shot poorly after all the above work. I tried about a dozen or more pellet types and almost gave up. Out of curiosity I slowly pushed a many pellets down the bore using a .177cal cleaning rod. There was distinct tight and loose spots within the length. The muzzle was loose. Cutting the barrel back to a tight spot wasn't an option because of the tight locations and the cocking effort needed on a full power NP. Also, I'm not so sure on the legality of cutting under 18" (900 fps rifle). I spent a lot of time on this bore carefully sanding and lapping. Sanding directions were followed from forum member Chevota. I made some lapping rods from bamboo BBQ skewers and slowly sanded and checked progress. The bore was now slightly larger but the tight spots were gone. Thankfully I found some fat H&N dome pellets that were of high quality. Finally, a slight bevel was put on the barrel chamber to easy loading.

Breech hinge - The hinge seemed okay but I disassembled, cleaned, lubed with moly, reassembled with Loctite and adjusted tension. The barrel will not flop down on it's own weight if I cock the rifle and crack it open again while still cocked. A slight tap with a finger is needed to get it to drop all the way down. The breech wedge spring seemed weak so I replaced it and moly coated the parts while the barrel was off.

Optics - As I mentioned above, this rifle ate a couple of variable power scopes already. I was also warned that heavy scopes will tend to slide back with the snappy NP recoil. I decided to go with a fixed 4X UTG-Leapers scope with an adjustable objective. The fixed power should be more durable and lighter in weight. I also used thin latex strips between the rings and scope for more grippy contact. The scope eventually slipped a tiny bit so I installed again and all has been well.

The good news - The work is done. At 10 metres this rifle now consistently groups 5 H&N FTT pellets into a ragged hole. The hole is not single pellet size but definitely small and at least overlapping pellets in a small cluster or an enlarged single irregular shaped hole. This is much better than the 1" and larger groups it was originally giving at 10m.

Last week I took the rifle to the country and was able to hit a 5 1/2" gong at 40, 50, 60 and 75 yards (offhand). The 40 and 50 yard distances were easy. The 60 and 75 took more care but regular hits were very common. The rifle will make a 28oz (796ml) tomato can dance at 50-60 yards. Complete pass through at 50 and single side holes at 60 yards.

Yesterday I took another drive to the country, measured out 75 yards and set up a benchrest (B&D Workmate). The Fury NP was rested in sandbags and I squeezed off 10 groups of 5 shots each. Half the shooting was in reasonably calm conditions but the other half was too breezy for my liking. Results ...

Calm conditions - 2.09, 2.47, 2.42, 2.48, 1.88 - Ave = 2.27" ctc
Breezy conditions - 3.13, 3.83, 3.6, 3.18, 3.20

Final thoughts - The Fury NP was a mess of a rifle with problems that took a lot of time to fix. The bore constrictions and rough receiver tube were factory QC issues. The bend barrel may have been an accident from the original owner of this refurb rifle. After everything was addressed the rifle behaved quite well and delivered reasonable accuracy for the budget price tag. I guess the price on these Chinese Crosman rifles would be significantly higher if they were made to a higher standard.


Attachments:
Shooting 002b.jpg
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Last edited by TCooper on Fri Jun 26, 2020 11:21 am, edited 7 times in total.
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 26, 2020 10:35 am 
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Location: Ontario, Canada
Here is a pic to show the bend in the barrel. Many years ago there was a pic circulating that showed a FWB PCP pistol with a barrel that bent around the air reservoir (corkscrew). Apparently it shot fine. The last couple of inches of barrel should be straight but the earlier part can have a bend or two.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 27, 2020 6:35 am 
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Joined: Mon May 26, 2014 1:08 am
Posts: 516
Location: Thunder Bay
Hi Todd!
I'm glad you got that cursed rifle to shoot for you!
The original barrel bend at the breach was my fault. Oily hand slipped off when cocking. It happens. Rather than attempting to straighten it at the breach, I thought I'd try bending the barrel mid way. I read a few articles about it where shooters had good results. It looks screwy, but it's effective. I bent the barrel in the wooden steps on my deck. It took a while. I didn't want to over bend it then try to bend it back (that would have looked even weirder) so I bent it a little, reassembled the gun and tried it for zero with the scope set in the middle of its adjustment range. I think I quit after three small bends. The wooden stairs prevented marring of the surface finish on the barrel.
The front screw stripped the first time I removed it. Probably a factory glitch, or the first owner liked to over-tighten everything.
You really don't know what to expect with a refurb Crosman. My other Fury, a springer, was a refurb too. It shot far to one side when I received it. A barrel bend fixed it. After the usual tune and trigger work, it's the rifle with which you shot a .162" CTC 5 shot group at 20 meters. It's my most accurate springer.
Just so members know, I have not been able to repeat that group. It wasn't a fluke. Todd consistently shoots my rifles better than I can.

_________________
12 springers and a couple of pumpers.
2 lathes and lots of scrap metal.

Too soon old too late smart.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 27, 2020 9:08 am 
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Joined: Sat Sep 03, 2005 9:25 am
Posts: 3476
Location: Ontario, Canada
ricksplace wrote:
Hi Todd!
I'm glad you got that cursed rifle to shoot for you!
The original barrel bend at the breach was my fault. Oily hand slipped off when cocking. It happens. Rather than attempting to straighten it at the breach, I thought I'd try bending the barrel mid way. I read a few articles about it where shooters had good results. It looks screwy, but it's effective. I bent the barrel in the wooden steps on my deck. It took a while. I didn't want to over bend it then try to bend it back (that would have looked even weirder) so I bent it a little, reassembled the gun and tried it for zero with the scope set in the middle of its adjustment range. I think I quit after three small bends. The wooden stairs prevented marring of the surface finish on the barrel.
The front screw stripped the first time I removed it. Probably a factory glitch, or the first owner liked to over-tighten everything.
You really don't know what to expect with a refurb Crosman. My other Fury, a springer, was a refurb too. It shot far to one side when I received it. A barrel bend fixed it. After the usual tune and trigger work, it's the rifle with which you shot a .162" CTC 5 shot group at 20 meters. It's my most accurate springer.
Just so members know, I have not been able to repeat that group. It wasn't a fluke. Todd consistently shoots my rifles better than I can.


I think that small "springer" Fury group is still on the gunshop wall. I was there yesterday for the first time in many months and noticed the 20m target group still on the bulletin board with my writing beside it.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 27, 2020 9:54 am 
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Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2006 5:50 pm
Posts: 787
Location: Nova Scotia
Todd

Here's the pistol
----------------------------------
From Beemansnet.com:

” After one of the big SHOT trade shows, the owners of the Westinger & Altenburger Co. (Feinwerkbau) of Germany presented us with this amazing feat of airgunsmithing – a Beeman/Feinwerkbau Model 2 CO2 pistol with the barrel making a complete twist around the gas cylinder! The gun actually shoots quite well! Note that the all-important final inch(25 mm) or so is straight – that and the crown are the only really important parts of the barrel as far as accuracy is concerned. When some shooter would say ” I think I see some little defect in the rifling way down inside my barrel, or the middle is a little off, or the barrel is not quite straight, and that is why I am not shooting well” , the airgunsmiths loved to bring out this gun and ask if his gun was more off line than this one! Beeman collection.”


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 27, 2020 7:56 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 26, 2014 1:08 am
Posts: 516
Location: Thunder Bay
The only thing I miss about that rifle was the sound it made. It sounded like a toilet plunger pulled off a linoleum floor. It made a loud "pwok".

_________________
12 springers and a couple of pumpers.
2 lathes and lots of scrap metal.

Too soon old too late smart.


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