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PostPosted: Tue Jul 28, 2020 9:28 pm 
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Posts: 3625
Location: Ontario, Canada
DocGadget wrote:
leadslinger wrote:
Actually Monolec 8430 oil is a detergent oil.

https://www.magnumairpower.com/airgun-oil-myths.html

I've always been amazed how much people focus on the "non detergent" part (I think it was mentionned in Daisy litterature a while ago if I'm not mistaken) but not only is Monolec detergent, their litterature mentions "exceptional detergency".


That's exactly where I read the ND recommendation. I had a couple of Daisy 717 pistols back in the early 90s and the manual said to lubricate with 30W-ND on the o-rings. I still use the ND because I have a big jug and it was only about $3 way back when I bought it.

A quick Google search will mention that detergent keeps the foreign particles flowing in the oil rather than sticking to the metal parts. In an airgun there is no oil pan for particles to settle and no oil filters to trap particles. None of this really matters for an airgun. The oil keeps the seals wet to help "seal" and also help to slow down the degeneration so they don't dry out, shrink and fall apart... as quickly.

"The basic difference is that detergent oils contain special additives which trap and hold dirt and engine deposits in suspension until the oil is changed. Non-detergent oil lacks these additives."

"Non-detergent oil was used before oil filters became standard equipment. This type of oil would "stick" contaminants to the sidewalls and valleys of the engine to prevent dirty oil from damaging bearing surfaces."

"30W non-detergent oil is recommended for compressors and hydraulic systems which require non-detergent oils. Non-detergent oils are effective in lubrication of bearings and chains in non-critical "once through" systems."


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2020 1:36 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2020 5:24 pm
Posts: 245
Location: Montreal
Awesome!! A big THANKS! :D to all your folks for the info, I wanted to read all your comments first... then went out today and got a nice ND W30 from Cdn Tire.

I just wanted to be 100% SURE.

I'm NEW to air guns, and I could not believe how expensive and how hard it was to find Pellgun oil. Sold out on most websites!


Thanks again!!

T.A.G ( tail Air Gunner )

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 11, 2020 11:44 pm 
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Location: Chilliwack, BC
Daryl wrote:
Heck of a testimony there, 5dotrz. Well done.
Synthetics including "Tranny oil, do not have petroleum oils in them.
They were synthesized FROM petoleum oils(products), but do not actually have petroleum in them.
Petroleum oils will not maintain their integrity in the high heat environment of the automatic transmission
but rather convert to asphalt in the heat of that environment.
That is how I understand them & could be why they do not attack the seals over time - no Petroleum.



Automatic transmission internal temperatures are quite low. a rule of thumb is that every 20 degrees operating temperature over 180 F reduces ATF life by 1/2. ATF, there are a number of versions having different sliding frictions at low sliding speeds, for example. ATF tends to have high detergent action which removes and holds deposits in suspension. Like others have mentioned, ATF is popular for many material applications from transmissions to some 1960s & 1970s Chrysler rear wheel drive differentials which speaks volumes to the EP (extreme pressure) characteristics. ATF used to be a popular remedy for gummed up hyraulic valve lifters (petroleum gums, lacquers and varnishes.

ATF is popular in hydraulic applications such as jacks and does well in protecting hydraulic pumps which can have significant sliding friction challenges, all of which compare to the lubrication requirements of air guns, IMO.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2020 2:44 pm 
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I have no idea if it's detergent or not but some guys swear coconut oil is the best :wink:

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2020 3:08 pm 
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Normk wrote:
Daryl wrote:
Heck of a testimony there, 5dotrz. Well done.
Synthetics including "Tranny oil, do not have petroleum oils in them.
They were synthesized FROM petoleum oils(products), but do not actually have petroleum in them.
Petroleum oils will not maintain their integrity in the high heat environment of the automatic transmission
but rather convert to asphalt in the heat of that environment.
That is how I understand them & could be why they do not attack the seals over time - no Petroleum.



Automatic transmission internal temperatures are quite low. a rule of thumb is that every 20 degrees operating temperature over 180 F reduces ATF life by 1/2. ATF, there are a number of versions having different sliding frictions at low sliding speeds, for example. ATF tends to have high detergent action which removes and holds deposits in suspension. Like others have mentioned, ATF is popular for many material applications from transmissions to some 1960s & 1970s Chrysler rear wheel drive differentials which speaks volumes to the EP (extreme pressure) characteristics. ATF used to be a popular remedy for gummed up hyraulic valve lifters (petroleum gums, lacquers and varnishes.

ATF is popular in hydraulic applications such as jacks and does well in protecting hydraulic pumps which can have significant sliding friction challenges, all of which compare to the lubrication requirements of air guns, IMO.


Interesting about temps being low. That is contrary to what I read, back in the late 70's.

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PostPosted: Sat Sep 12, 2020 3:18 pm 
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I knew all of this but like a sucker I still bought the little bottle. Serves me right. I probably have 30w nd oil just sitting around too.

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