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PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 12:22 am 
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Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2005 4:20 pm
Posts: 1999
Location: Spruce Grove AB
That's a nice rifle.
So many guns, so little time...
I would love one day to try casting my own bullets. But that seems like another hobby in itself.
I actually tried some cast bullets once. I replicated a blackpwder load using smokeless. Never chronied it but estimated 1200fps shooting some hard cast 405gr. It was keyholing at 50 yards. Could literally hear them clip the cardboard. So I gave up on that one pretty easy. I have a microgroove JM 1895, from what I read they aren't much good for cast. 1895 cowboy would be fun.
But as far as lever guns go, I want a Winchester 1896. Looked at a miroku in 405 win. Ooh what a beauty. That John browning I tell you. Hard to believe these were designed so long ago. Guy was like the Michaelangelo of the wild west :lol:

Heres my 1895. Got a sweet deal on it. It's a little picky with coal, won't cycle that Hornady crap. Too hard to reload anyway with the short cases. And do not accidentally try to push a 5th round in the tube or it'll lock up like a vault. Don't ask :lol:
Bit of a beater but I love it. Seen a lot of miles. The Scout setup is pretty recent. Haven't sighted it in yet. Sure points fast though.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 1:38 pm 
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Location: P.G. B.C.
I should have noted, my brother killed 2 moose with his Sharps. Both bullets exited perfectly.
Moose died within 2 steps - done deal, one shot each.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 1:53 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2011 12:35 pm
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Location: P.G. B.C.
I've been loading .45/70's since about 1978, as well as .45 Colt for a model 94. I've not found any of them difficult to load for, even the .32 Short Colt, piece of cake- I guess
it's what you are used to. I've been loading my own rifle ammo since 1967/8. .22 Hornet, .22-250 and 6.5RemMag. Currently have 82 sets of mould blocks (bullet moulds) & 42 sets of
rifle and handgun dies & 4 shotshell loaders. 5 handloading presses for rifles and handguns. At 71 yrs. of age, stuff piles up over the years - been doing this since I was 17 yrs. old.
The Winchester model 95 in .405 is the one you were referring to. The Winchester Model 96 was actually a 12 gauge shotgun, called The Expert and was an O/U.
I've been casting rifle and handgun bullets as well as round balls since 1973. You get used to it.
The Marlin Micro-Groove 1895 barrels shot quite well with cast bullets, as long as the bullets are about .460" in diameter. Their groove diameters were a little larger than normal. If the
bullets are too hard an alloy as well as being undersized even slightly, poor shooting and even keyholing will happen. If hard alloy to allow higher speeds, they need to be from 001" to
.002" larger than the groove diameter.
It's all about size and alloy - for most guns & yes, there is a bit of a learning curve.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 7:33 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2005 4:20 pm
Posts: 1999
Location: Spruce Grove AB
Yes, right again. Win 1895. The old military gun sold to Russia. They lost a barge on the trip across the ocean I believe.

I've been reloading for about 6 years. And just like anything there is quite a learning curve. But, I only reload. I Don't bother with factory ammo. I don't really see the point unless you just wanna rattle off a bunch of .223. the first 270wsm I got I did buy a box of federal fusion. Drove out in the bush and spotted an old stove just minding its own business. Took one shot. Scope was on (bought gun used) so it was good enough for me. Threw the case in my pocket. Later that day I empty my pockets and there is a primer less case! Look at the rifle and the bolt face got gas etched. I checked headspace, I looked for bulging, all the things they said. Everything checked out. So then I pulled every round in that box apart. Not sure what powder was used in them but cross reference with reloading books the burn rate should have been around h1000. Even the powder kernels were identical to H1000.
Anyway, weighed each charge and case individually. Some loads (if it was h1000) I determined to be over max. Difference in charge weights was about 3 grains. Cases were pretty inconsistent as well. So, overpressure factory load. I figure.
I trust my loads over an automated machine any day.

Those cast bullets I had were .459, no gas check. And they were hard, don't recall how hard though. So you're probably spot on there too. Maybe one day I'll try again.

That's quite a collection of gear you got going on though. Mine fluctuates a bit. As it sits now, 22-250, 25-06, 270wsm, 45-70, .223, 303 British. I think that's it. There's just so many things to spend money on! :lol:


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 16, 2021 10:25 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2011 12:35 pm
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Location: P.G. B.C.
Interesting. I am surprised the .270 WSM showed the pressure excursion. This usually doesn't happen with factory ammo. I am also surprised at the loading variations.
Something is wrong, for sure.
Had you sent a letter and returned the ammo, they'd have some something, however since in Canada you cannot mail ammunition, well, behind the 8 ball there. Contact with
the lot number might have sufficed though.
You still need gas-checks for anything over about 1,500fps. Solid base bullets won't work. The gas check protects the bullet base, but still allows obturation of the bullet.
If bullets are too hard for the pressure generated, the bullet cannot slug up. I've driven straight WW (about 12brinel) cast bullets to 2,200fps in .45 & .50 calibre with excellent accuracy.
They also worked with full power black powder loads, but 1/2 and 1/2 WW/pure lead was better. WW works to about 1,300fps in .44 and .45 handguns, but not in .357 mags.
They need harder lead.
It's all about balance - calibre - pressure - velocity.
It's unlikely WW used a Hodgdon "canister" (over the shelf) powder in their factory loads, but variations of 3gr. is outrageous & can easily push things too close to bad actions/reactions.
Rifles vary - groove diameters, land diameters - not much, but also vary in chamber dimensions. Factory ammo is supposed to be safe in all guns of THAT chambering. Add a bunch of poor
dimensions that add up to nasty/bad and "things" can happen. I had a rifle once, that ran 10 reloads with a certain powder just fine with normal ballistics and accuracy, then bingo, a pressure excursion that melted the case head, broke the front of the bolt and tried to freeze the action. Luckily, it was a Mauser, with an Ackley IMP ctg, that extracted perfectly. I threw the bolt away
and had to buy another, then fit all that brass to the new headspace by necking it up to .43, then back down to .375 to form a new shoulder for fireforming. NP. That rifle is still running 100%, 30years after that 'kaffufle'. I found THAT chambering is not suitable for H322 powder, although it is a wonderful powder in 3 other rifles I shoot.

Also - the smaller the calibre, the harder the bullets must be for a given calibre/pressure.
Also - it is interesting that in the .22 Hornet, you can drive cast bullets of Linotype alloy to about 2,600fps, but in a .243 through .338, the maximum is about 2,200fps.
With hardened WW alloy I ran 270gr. Cast GC .375 bullets at 2,700fps, with MOA accuracy and no leading. I did use LBT Blue lube.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 25, 2021 9:21 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2005 4:20 pm
Posts: 1999
Location: Spruce Grove AB
I have heard the Mauser is pretty much indestructible. M98 large ring? Pretty much the benchmark every other bolt gun is based on. Not sure about that statement, but I know they're tough. Don't see too many rem700 African safari rifles, but Ruger 77? Yup.

Here's that case that failed. Searched thru my photos and actually found it.
You can see the gas etch on the bolt face. It actually pitted on one spot.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 25, 2021 10:20 pm 
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Location: P.G. B.C.
Yeah - blown primers do that, sometimes more/worse than others. If the pressure is high enough to expand the base to the point the primer is loose and BLOWS, it really doesn't matter
which action it was. Cased expand at a given pressure - for interest's sake, lets just say it's way over 70,000PSI.
When Marlin tested the Model 1875, they actually ran pressure testing to 70,000psi and reported "normal" pressure signs. That is quite phenominal, actually, but understandable when
you take into consideration the diameter of the rim, nominally .605" in diameter. That is a huge ring of hardened brass around the primer, more than on any magnum case, however the
largest WTBY cases come close and likely are stronger due to more brass surrounding the primer, not just a ring of it, .062" to about .066" or so thick.
One thing about blown primers, is that sometimes a disk of primer metal is blown inside the bolt, if the primer "disks" before being blown. This can cause a miss fire later on. A miss fire is
when the gun goes click and the charge fails to manifest itself.(doesn't go off, due to the firing pin's travel being arrested by the disk of primer cup.)
Mauser designed actions are superior to others in that they have an excellent gas diverging ports which reduces the rearward blast of gas in the case a primer or the case itself blows out the
back end.
I had a model 98 chambered up in a .375/06IMP (Wildcat) that had a pressure "?excursion" with a load of H322. I was testing loads & had 4 or 5 fire perfectly, with good speeds and close
velocities, showing promise for that powder in that ctg. Next shot, gas shot back against my glasses, but not much as most of it was diverted down in to the magazine well, blowing the magazine
out onto the bench and splitting the polymer stock out the side. The bolt lifted normally (minimum case taper in this wildcat ctg.) & the claw extractor extracted the case. There was brass welded/
soldered onto the bottom of the bolt from the case head which was 1/2 missing. THAT my friends, is a pressure excursion. Hope it never happens to you. I threw the bolt and action into the garbage
after destroying their integrity. That powder is not suitable for that ctg. PERIOD. There was not enough room in the case for "too much power" - and I always check the powder levels in all cases
prior to seating the bullets.
I am glad I was using a 98 Mauser.
I have a new .375/06IMP, also on a model 98 action, a Mark 10 action, actually, with minimum case taper (.005" per side) & i have no inclination to try H322 again, in it. I do use H322, in my .45/70, my .45 1.9", and couple .17 Caliber rifles, with total satisfaction. I use BLC2 & H4895 in my .375 as well as in my 2 9.3x62's, both of which are also on Model 98's, one an Oberdorf factory sporter, the other, another Mark 10 Mauser.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 25, 2021 10:46 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2005 4:20 pm
Posts: 1999
Location: Spruce Grove AB
Woo! Yes that would be an ugly failure for sure.
The gun I had was a savage 11. Didn't notice anything til I looked at the case. Primer wasn't even hammered flat.

Makes sense with the large diameter rim cartridge. More support for the primer.

Was thinking, do you weigh your brass? I load batches of closely matched cases and try to keep them together. Weights can differ by a lot, 20-25 grain spread I have seen from the same bag of brass. Factory loaded ammunition cases too. Could put a case over pressure I figure.

I had a "hang fire" once. Had one of those norinco m14s, decided to hand load 100 rounds of a known good load. Everything was great. Click. Uhhh... Haha now what? So I waited a bit. Ejected it and looked at it... Put to my ear and shook it. Empty. :lol:


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 25, 2021 11:25 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2011 12:35 pm
Posts: 7913
Location: P.G. B.C.
Savage, eh. I should have known but didn't look closely enough at the lugs.
Loading without powder will do that. :D
I've not seen those gross weight differences except for cases of different mfgr.- like Fed and RP are very close with WW much lighter, higher capacity.
I find in my .30/06 as well as the .375's & 9.3x62's I've made up with RP and Fed cases, they shoot well together. I do not mix WW brass with them due
to point of impact changes.
I've seen the odd case being 5 to 6gr. out of the average, but not often. I've never seen the wide variation you spoke of. It certainly could happen. When shooting
groups with my .17's, I make sure I use the same "lot" of brass, that is, the brass that has been fired the same number of times since annealing.
The most consistent brass I ever saw, was the lot of .220 Swift RP cases I had. I bought 500 of one lot. The most they varied in the extreme, high to low, was 1 1/2gr.
Most were exactly the same weight. The only other brass I've seen that close was "Custom" Nosler brass in .308, .243 and 9.3x62. Amazing brass. It did not vary 1 gr.
Of course, I only bought a couple hundred of each. Hairy expensive.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 25, 2021 11:34 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2011 12:35 pm
Posts: 7913
Location: P.G. B.C.
This is my 14 gauge (.69) rifle, aiming and being shot with almost the hunting load, 140gr. 2F in stead of 165gr. 482gr. round ball.
We (my bro and I) were shooting a 200yard postal match which was 5 shots offhand, 5 shots any position. We chose cross sticks
for the any position.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 26, 2021 11:52 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 13, 2005 4:20 pm
Posts: 1999
Location: Spruce Grove AB
Ha nice, that rifle looks pretty good on you.
In my experiences with hunting, it's either really close shots or really long shots. Almost never in the middle. Really gotta try one of those shooting sticks... Not too many trees or stumps out in the great fields of Alberta. Haven't attempted much hunting out here, it's just too busy. And I don't know how to hunt here :lol:

The brass I spoke of were a couple different bags of WW brass. Cheap stuff. I mean it's not all bad, but the odd few are way heavy or light. They go in the recycling bucket.i find nosler brass to be real soft. And expensive. But that is once fired factory ammo brass I got with a rifle. Might not be the same grade as their custom stuff.

I had a 325wsm a-bolt for a spell. Bought that one with 150 brass also. Looked around and ammo/brass was stupid expensive. I think the nosler custom was $80 for 20... Something ridiculous like that. Was a good shooter though, nice light hammer. Cut 4" off the barrel with a hacksaw, filed it true and crowned it with a case chamfer tool. Even drilled and tapped for a front ramp... 10/22 rear sight modified to fit.

I know what you're thinking. But hey you gotta do what you gotta do.

But it worked great. Still shot an honest 1moa. With 220gr Sierra game kings. I think it was doing 2300fps. It was my backpacking rifle. Just under 6lbs.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2021 1:08 am 
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Location: P.G. B.C.
Sounds interesting, but I do like longer bls.
My .260 has a 25" bl. 24" on the old 1936 model 70 and 28" (with muzzle break) on the .375.
I do have a 23.4" on the 6.5x55 and 22" on the Varberger 6.5x55.
Those are my big game rifles, other than the Sharps and 2 large bore lever guns. The .50/95 has a 28" bl.

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2021 1:17 pm 
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Location: P.G. B.C.
Here's a pair of 1876's. Top one is mine in .50/95. Both have 28" bl.s.
Bottom one in my bros, in .45/60. He restocked his in a nice piece of walnut.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2021 7:39 pm 
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Location: Spruce Grove AB
Oh yeah them are beauties. Got some nice sights on your bros gun too. Nice wood. I like octagon barrels too. All round those are nice.

I looked at some high grade Henry's at Mountain man in Cranbrook. He had some real pretty ones. Haven't seen too many other ones like that in person. They carry quite a high value if you know what I mean.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 27, 2021 8:03 pm 
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Location: P.G. B.C.
The sights on Taylor's rifle were $1,500.00 cdn. I know have a Smith Ladder sight on mine and it has 3 detents in-between each 100
mark up to 1,000. This has allowed me to record sight settings so far, to 600 meters.
The Smith sight was $300.00 landed here, but lists for $169.95 in the States.
Level with the top surface of the blade, it is zeroed at 200 meters. If the front sight is held
down in the angled notch, level with where the curved angles start, it is zeroed at 100 meters,
so sighting is simple out to 200 meters which is about as far as I would shoot a moose with it.
Using this sight a couple summers ago, I managed to get into the dirt just under the 1000 meter
buffalo when I ran out of ammo, so didn't get the 1000 meter zero, however I have a quick start
on it if I do that again this summer.


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