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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 9:07 am 
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Posts: 306
Location: Hamilton On
Hey all,

I have a Remington Vantage .177 and I would like to build my own custom stock for it. My wife works at a custom bass guitar shop and has full access to all of the goodies there. My question is, where can I get all the measurements I need for the routing needed to fit the action in the stock? Is there a schematic out there with precise measurements or should I just take measurements from my existing stock? What is the best way to take these measurements if that is the case?
This will be my first foray into such a big project and I want it to go fairly smooth. The bass shop can provide me with the rough cutting and the routing and I would like to carve the rest myself. They also use quite a few exotic woods so I will be able to choose something unique and after it is complete I am planning on returning it to there to be sprayed with finish. My wife does all the wet sanding, buffing and final assembly of the instruments and is very talented at what she does, and builds a guitar for herself once a year with her bosses permission (has even refinished a few gun stocks for a friend in the past). Going to have her teach me the processes so I can do as much myself as possible. I even hope to spray my own finish and do the wet sand and buff.
Any guidance will be much appreciated.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 9:49 am 
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Joined: Sun Jul 15, 2012 1:03 pm
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Location: Lindsay Ont Area
From my experience, it's alwaysbest to copy and take measurments from the factory stock, I use a milling machine for the inletting. I would not cut down to the factory dimensions with power tools, leave a little extra wood so you can get a nice tight fit by hand

O.A

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PostPosted: Sat Jun 15, 2013 10:19 am 
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Location: Canada
There are a series of very informative stock making posts...a tutorial of the process if you will, by Michael Chavka.

Search the Green (Crosman airgun forum) for "Stock Making 101".

Al


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 6:34 am 
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Location: Hamilton On
I checked out the "Green" Crosman forum. All I've got to say is WOW that is a beautiful stock on the Maurader. I can only hope mine turns out as nice.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 16, 2013 11:57 am 
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theblackbirder wrote:
From my experience, it's alwaysbest to copy and take measurments from the factory stock, I use a milling machine for the inletting. I would not cut down to the factory dimensions with power tools, leave a little extra wood so you can get a nice tight fit by hand

O.A


X2. That is exactly what I did when I built the stock for my FT gun. Remember to factor in your own needs, Length of Pull, Comb drop etc. and TAKE YOUR TIME :shock:

It's not easy to put wood back after you've taken too much off :D

DaveD :D

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2013 7:26 am 
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Location: Northern Ontario
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 23, 2013 12:00 pm 
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Location: Kingston, ON
Gippeto wrote:
There are a series of very informative stock making posts...a tutorial of the process if you will, by Michael Chavka.

Search the Green (Crosman airgun forum) for "Stock Making 101".

Al


Wow, I just checked that out.... very good read! It inspires me to have another go at stock making... :mrgreen:

http://www.network54.com/Forum/275684/t ... he+Forearm
and
http://www.network54.com/Forum/275684/t ... +Finishing

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 4:47 am 
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Location: Hamilton On
Thanks Paddyfritz. That is what I was looking for.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 5:40 am 
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Tinner wrote:
Thanks Paddyfritz. That is what I was looking for.


Its from the UK Chinese forum.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 5:29 pm 
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Location: Hamilton On
Man, I still have so many sites to visit. :rolleyes: I have read a ton of threads and have sooo much to learn.

This could be a fantastic failure or a rewarding experience. Regardless, now I have to choose the wood. My wife suggested Koa but I am not convinced looking at pics. My choice so far is Cocobolo. I made my own fixed blade knife and used Cocobolo for the handle and loved the way it showed off the grain but subtle because it is so dark.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 7:43 pm 
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Tinner wrote:
Man, I still have so many sites to visit. :rolleyes: I have read a ton of threads and have sooo much to learn.

This could be a fantastic failure or a rewarding experience. Regardless, now I have to choose the wood. My wife suggested Koa but I am not convinced looking at pics. My choice so far is Cocobolo. I made my own fixed blade knife and used Cocobolo for the handle and loved the way it showed off the grain but subtle because it is so dark.


I tried making one about 2 years ago, and it failed. But I have learned a lot more about woodworking now and I'd definitely like to give it another go. Be warned, making your own stock is a labour of love, and you have to be patient.

About the woods, I would recommend good old walnut or perhaps black cherry. Those are my two favourites because they have beautiful grain, but are easy enough to work with at the same time. If you are trying to shape a stock by hand, hardness of the wood really becomes a huge factor. As beautiful as Cocobolo is, it is quite hard (about 2500 on the Janka scale as opposed to walnut at 1200), and if you're trying to shape a stock with chisels, rasps and sandpaper, you may get fed up. You need to remove a lot more wood making a stock than making knife grips!

What is your tool supply like? A bandsaw, router, drill press, good chisels, rasps and a rotary tool are all pretty much must-haves.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 7:49 pm 
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Location: Canada
Just making a suggestion here...

Whichever wood you choose initially, check it out before actually purchasing it.

My wife's uncle is a hard core wood turner, I was surprised to find out that the dust generated from working/sanding some woods is quite toxic...toxic enough that even though he COULD open the doors of his shop/garage, he wears a positive pressure breathing mask when working with such woods.

Al


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 24, 2013 8:15 pm 
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Location: Red Deer Alberta
Gippeto wrote:
Just making a suggestion here...

Whichever wood you choose initially, check it out before actually purchasing it.

My wife's uncle is a hard core wood turner, I was surprised to find out that the dust generated from working/sanding some woods is quite toxic...toxic enough that even though he COULD open the doors of his shop/garage, he wears a positive pressure breathing mask when working with such woods.

Al

From my experience I would back this statement 100%. Be careful with dust from exotic woods, especially from South America and Africa. I have figured I was going to die more than once and now I always wear a mask and only work where it is well ventilated. Once you have had a snootful of a toxic wood (dust) you don't want a second go round. Be careful.


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