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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2015 6:47 am 
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Hi, something I've been wondering about - new springs come with 1 coil flattened at each end to make a decent bearing surface. When I cut down a spring I end up with an annoying half coil in mid air. Is it possible to reshape the cut end to make it look like the original, or does that have to be done at time of manufacture?

Jim


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2015 7:06 am 
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I'm no expert but I heated smaller one red hot and was able to flatten the end so it was close to the way they do it when they are made.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2015 9:18 am 
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Although it's not necessary, a closed and ground flat end will give a smoother shot cycle and may help extend the life of the spring. Some manufacturers detune their rifles by just cutting the full power spring and leaving the end coil dangling. I've know some non-PAL HW rifles come like that. Anyhow, this makes the spring more likely to buckle and warp with usage and that can lead to a twangy and unpleasant shot cycle and early fracture. I have detuned "springs" by cutting off coils and then clamping the last 2 coils with a vice grip (channel lock pliers), wrapping the rest of the spring in heavily water soaked towels and then applying very focused flame to the end coil to soften it and close the end. The final step is to grind flat and polish. I have only done it on non-PAL springs but it works well and i have not had any problems. Bear in mind that there is more trial-and-error because your spring will be shorter and the energy storage will change. So, if it's shooting with the desired power level before closing the end, you will find the power drops after closing it. :drinkers:

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2015 10:19 am 
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Location: Illinois
I just grind the end flat on the side of a grinding wheel. Just don't overheat it. I've never had a problem.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2015 11:19 am 
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Heating red hot should be followed by dunking in oil, any motor oil will do. Putting the spring in a vice will transfer some of the heat from travelling down the spring, but the wet rag works to.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2015 11:58 am 
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If you are talking about hammer springs, I just use a couple of pair of needle nose pliers to rebend it down in contact with the next coil, then grind flat.... Won't work on a big spring, like in a springer, of course, without heat....

Bob

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2015 4:22 pm 
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Like others here I grind the end flat like the original, starting about 3/4 of a coil back, and grinding until the end is only ~25% of it's original thickness. I also grind the underside a bit, maybe 1/8th turn back from the tip, and I bevel the sides of the tip. Then comes the hard part, heating and bending it so it looks good. I use a generic propane torch and needle nose pliers, or a hard object to press against. No need to worry about heat soak because you should be done very quickly and it won't spread much past your work area. No need to cool it in water or oil either because that part of the spring is not used so it's temper is not a factor. Look at the already done end to see where they bent it and do the same. It generally won't be bent in one specific spot, but often you can tell most of the bend is in one area. Some have a more even bend as if they heated the entire coil and pressed it against something flat, which is probably exactly what they did. My guess is the factory grinds the coil down quickly with a grinder which makes it red hot, then they press it against something flat, then wire wheel it and done. Your work doesn't need to be perfect, but it's nice to practice on an old spring if you can. Afterwards your coils end might be bent inward a bit which may scrape your guide. This is one reason I bevel the end first, but if it's an issue you can either put it on the piston end, or grind the offending section with a Dremel, or heat it again and bend it to where you want it. The whole thing is actually easy, so if you have an old spring to practice on you'll be pretty confidant after a few practice runs. In general it's better imo to put the cut end on the piston side anyway because the piston doesn't care if the spring isn't straight, but many guides are plastic and a spring that tends to lean can cause problems, maybe even break the guide. To go a step further I also sand the inside of the spring with 600 sandpaper which reduces wear on the guide, specifically if it's like a Diana or similar with a plastic guide. I also sand the outside of the spring to wear/friction there. Then grease it all with non-sticky grease, unless you're using spring tar to get rid of the spring twang, black tar only, which you put on a bone dry spring.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 04, 2015 4:43 pm 
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Thanks for all the advice! I was only thinking of small springs like the hammer, trigger, valves etc.. I've never had much luck trying to bend them with pliers, but it sounds like having two pairs of needle-nose might be the key. Beyond that, I shall try the propane torch. Working on main-springs must be quite a challenge, there's a fair bit of metal in those things!


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2015 12:03 am 
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Location: United States
Oh geeze, and here I am rambling on. For those I wouldn't bother or I'd just do a very basic grind and maybe bend but w/o the heat. Main springs are more critical for a few reasons which is why all the effort, little springs are no big deal as a general rule, but it nicer to make them look good and clean for personal preference.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2015 9:50 pm 
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Location: Victoria, BC and Clarkston, WA
Dukemeister wrote:
Although it's not necessary, a closed and ground flat end will give a smoother shot cycle and may help extend the life of the spring. Some manufacturers detune their rifles by just cutting the full power spring and leaving the end coil dangling. I've know some non-PAL HW rifles come like that. Anyhow, this makes the spring more likely to buckle and warp with usage and that can lead to a twangy and unpleasant shot cycle and early fracture. I have detuned "springs" by cutting off coils and then clamping the last 2 coils with a vice grip (channel lock pliers), wrapping the rest of the spring in heavily water soaked towels and then applying very focused flame to the end coil to soften it and close the end. The final step is to grind flat and polish. I have only done it on non-PAL springs but it works well and i have not had any problems. Bear in mind that there is more trial-and-error because your spring will be shorter and the energy storage will change. So, if it's shooting with the desired power level before closing the end, you will find the power drops after closing it. :drinkers:


Do what Duke said!!!

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