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PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2015 10:53 pm 
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OK, so air-gun lube is something of a religious mine-field. This is not an attempt to belittle your favourite options for keeping things slippy, or even any sort of attempt at a "best of" list. I just happened to notice that the stuff I reach for most often is all really good value, and thought it might be worth sharing.

For hinges and places where the lube needs to penetrate: motor oil. I usually have litres of the stuff on hand for my rust bucket, and I keep a supply on the work bench in a needle applicator bottle for the lathe. It does the trick just fine for plenty of spots around the air guns.

For lubing o-rings and seals: automatic transmission fluid. At least if I remember. If not, I've probably hit it with the motor oil. (I have some silicone grease on order for use in high pressure applications, but this probably doesn't come under the value category). Curiously, pelgun oil probably also counts as good value here too. Even though it comes in small quantities and costs a lot/volume, it seems to last forever when you use it 1 drop at a time. But maybe that's because I've been supplementing it with ATF :)

For metal-metal sliding surfaces: cheap & cheerful CT moly grease. It's not the high moly content of the honda moly, but what's in there seems to work a treat. $5 gets you a lifetimes supply - I'm still working my way through the stuff that was stuck in the lid - I haven't touched the actual tube yet. This was the stuff that got me thinking of this post.

http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/motom ... OFlW81GjUY

Downsides - it stinks to high heaven, and it's so slick that the moment you touch the container the stuff is making a beeline for your elbow. Next stop armpit, and heaven help you after that. Seriously, you don't want to drop this stuff - it would get everywhere and be a nightmare to clean up.

Jim


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 12:28 am 
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Location: Winnipeg, Canada
I've found the CTC moly to be a bit temperature sensitive- gets a little thick in the cold.
(yeah, there was a time I played with springers :wink: )

Go to lube is simple cheepy air tool oil from Walmart. Works well in pumpers, and doesn't gum anything up. It's easy on "o" rings too. Don't think I'll get through that pint in what's left of this lifetime :lol:

Do hafta investigate silicone oil. Got a sneaky build coming up soon, perchance...
Conventional wisdom there is that Singer sewing machine oil is a fine silicone oil....

Regards,

Doc Sharptail

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 2:24 am 
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I use 100% Silicone grease in pumpers, this can be had at most dive shops for not much $$$, and is made specifically for Orings and the like :drinkers:

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 5:47 am 
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silicon cup grease from a plumbing shop is pure silicon and cheap too (about $3).

Silicon shock oil for RC cars can be used as a substitute for rmcoil. Buy the lightest grade they have. $6 buys a lifetime supply for you and all your friends.

I also use CTC moly grease in the tube(the black stinky stuff). I have a springer with 10,000 shots through it, lubed with that CTC grease.

Yup, this lube stuff is kinda like alchemy. Great fun.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 7:14 am 
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I suppose if you wanted to economize on maintenance for economy airguns it makes some sense to save a few pennies here and there. I don't know that I would be using CTC moly grease http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/motom ... OHbdst0zIU that costs $5.29 for 400g to lube an air rifle that was not an economy model. Yes, you can lube dozens, perhaps a hundred or more, air rifles with 400 grams of CTC moly, but for $11.99 you can get 2 oz of the "real" stuff http://www.specialtyshootingsportsoutdo ... -2-oz.html (or $7.99 for 1 oz, for those who will never use much). Don't cheap out on a $500 plus air rifle when it comes to internal lubrication.

The other substitutes are good. But the same logic that says Pellgun oil is a good value despite its high cost per volume when there is a substitute (ATF) for a fraction of the cost by volume should apply for using any regular "gun oil" as lubricant rather than motor oil. Of course, most people usually have a liter or two of motor oil but do not normally keep ATF around unless needed.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 7:18 am 
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Thanks for the pointers - I'll have to check those out!


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 7:33 am 
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Hi PG, good points. I'm not suggesting to use the CT grease instead of honda moly (although I may not have made that very clear originally), but if you need a generic grease this seems to be a pretty good one. I find it better in most applications than the white lithium greases that I used before (except for the smell). My airguns are all low-end, and since I spend more time building than shooting they tend to get re-lubed fairly frequently. If I had high end guns that rarely saw the business end of a screwdriver then no doubt I'd not be so interested in the cost of lube :)


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 7:53 am 
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Location: Thunder Bay
I have to agree with Penage guy. I have been on a fairly steep learning curve with tuning springers. I figured the best way to learn was to get in there and tear them apart. One of my chinese springers has been torn apart so many times I have lost count. All of my springers are cheapies (refurbs too).

If and when I tune a quality gun, I will use premium lubes.

just saw everhopeful's post. Looks like are both at the same place!

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12 springers and a couple of pumpers.
2 lathes and lots of scrap metal.

I'm not multitasking. I'm doing something else until I remember what I was doing.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 10:40 am 
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Interesting lube choices.
The metal to metal lube I am absolutely stuck on and will always use is lyman super moly superfine bore paste. I put that ...........on everything.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 10:45 am 
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DigitalFx33 wrote:
Interesting lube choices.
The metal to metal lube I am absolutely stuck on and will always use is lyman super moly superfine bore paste. I put that ...........on everything.

The product referred to may not be suitable to use when a lubricant is needed on the internals of an air rifle. It is a product designed to be "applied directly to the bore. Brushed into the pores of the rifling, it smooths and polishes the surface to a black, shiny friction-reducing finish." See http://www.lymanproducts.com/lyman/tumb ... -cream.php


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2015 11:44 am 
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I know exactly what it does. I burnish it into the metal parts and then put a thin coat over them. After 2000 shots and an inspection shows no noticeable wear or marks. But there is a right and wrong place to use this stuff for sure.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2015 7:47 am 
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Or you could use the dry form and do an even better job in the bore and everywhere else, plus nobody can argue about it being the wrong lube. Dry is much more versatile because you can also mix it with whatever grease and/or oil to make whatever lube is best for whatever part. Turn most any lube into premium lube, even add it to your cars engine.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2015 8:48 am 
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I have always been hesitant to use anything other than a lightly oiled patch on the bore.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2015 10:39 am 
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jgoodz420 wrote:
I use 100% Silicone grease in pumpers, this can be had at most dive shops for not much $$$, and is made specifically for Orings and the like :drinkers:


couldn't find any of this out where I used to live but heard "dielectric grease" for sparkplug wires... is the same/similar? true or was I being fed a line of crap??? lol :idea:

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2015 4:38 pm 
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Yes you can use dielectric grease. When assembling a pumper gun it's probably better to use grease than the silicone oil, but once together and doing maintenance the oil will be much better since it can migrate. They don't need much anyway, you just want the rings and plunger to be coated so they seal better and don't dry out. As the rubber ages it'll harden and the plunger will no longer expand under pressure when pumping and it lets your air escape. Those parts are typically cheap and worth installing new ones. The plunger will typically be a factory only part, the O-rings can usually be had at a hardware store. Just be sure the O-rings are quality, not the cheap china crap with a seam on the sealing edge.
The rubber parts on a pumper may not be able to handle tranny fluid, if not they'll harden or break down. If they do you just replace them and clean the gun of any debris.
I wouldn't use spray silicone, the carrier and/or thinner may attack the rubber.


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