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PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 11:13 am 
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Location: Hamilton
Need to fashion a Left handed set of grips for my new Hatsan Model 25, and possibly for
an IZH if I get good results, this is a little ambitious for Me!
What would be a good alternative to wood that is easy to carve, grind and fashion,
and is readily available?
What type of wood is the easiest to work with that would be practical?

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PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 11:45 am 
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What type of wood is the easiest to work with that would be practical?

Basswood is one of easiest woods to carve (and a top choice for artistic carvers), but is probably is not tough enough for regular use on a gun. However, it could be used for quick prototyping.
The ideal wood is a hardwood like oak or maple. I have found that actual carving is usually not very effective on hard wood. You really need power tools like a table saw, a router and especially a table sander with coarse sandpaper.


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PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 4:45 pm 
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Location: Victoria, BC and Clarkston, WA
Basswood or Balsa.

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PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 5:29 pm 
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Location: Central West River Nova Scotia
American walnut. Very easy to shape and looks great. The gun stock standard for a reason.

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PostPosted: Tue May 12, 2015 11:20 pm 
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Like Joe says. Easy to work with and looks great.


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PostPosted: Thu May 14, 2015 7:30 pm 
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Location: Lebanon, CT
Actually carving, rather than shaping by other means, would be a difficult project. That is because much of the work would be across the grain. Figured soft maple (it's not all that soft) is a nice wood to work, as well as, like an above post suggested, walnut, and they both look nice. Cherry is another nice wood. There are some very hard woods, like Ipe, that are relatively easy to work, and beautiful besides. You might want to consider wood laminates such as Dymond wood, which are available from knife making supply outlets. They come in about every color imaginable, and can be quite striking in appearance. They are stabilized and need no finish. If you have a drill press, small sanding drums (3/4", 1") with 50 grit would help shape the wood. Rasps (used gently) and files would help also. RC

http://www.knifemaking.com/SearchResult ... ymond+wood


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PostPosted: Thu May 14, 2015 10:17 pm 
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Location: P.G. B.C.
Pine, Spruce, Boxwood(basswod) - "automotive bondo" and a plastic bagged hand can be used for special shapes and finger grips & thumb rests if desired. Painting with one of the 'special' deck paints can make for an any colour grip - again, if desired.
At a hobby store, you may find balsa in softness from wood that you can indent with your thumb, to as hard as cedar or pine. Laminating the harder material will make for better grips. The laminations, if using a coloured epoxy (food colouring), can give really wild dark lines as the grip shape cuts into other layers - and back again.
Imagine alternating red and black food colouring in a light coloured wood like balsa, pine or maple.

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PostPosted: Fri May 15, 2015 8:23 pm 
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Location: Hamilton
Thanks for All Your Suggestions! Big Help

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