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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 5:45 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 10, 2011 12:29 pm
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Location: New Brunswick
I know there are an assortment of other machining tools for modifying your airguns. This is just a list of the basic tools for shooting.

When I got into this hobby I bought myself a few simple tools that I thought were a requirement.
- a chronograph to measure the speed of my shots
- a scale capable of reading grains since most pellet tins don't provide the weight
I actually already have one that reads in grams & ounces but I didn't want the headache of conversions.
- a rangefinder so I know just how far away my targets are
- sandbags or a gun rest to steady your shots
I bought a monopod gun rest, removed the fixture on the top and mounted it on top of a camera tripod. It works great.

Can you guys add anything to this list?
Maybe a laser bore sighter to help zeroing your scope?
Bore cleaning tools?




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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 6:12 am 
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Joined: Tue Jan 29, 2013 6:54 pm
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Location: Northeastern Ontario
A good start. I'd add to the list measuring tools such as calipers and micrometers. A good set of screwdrivers is helpful, too.


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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 6:24 am 
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Location: New Brunswick
Penage Guy wrote:
A good start. I'd add to the list measuring tools such as calipers and micrometers. A good set of screwdrivers is helpful, too.

Good point Penage Guy. Good quality proper fitting screwdrivers are a must otherwise you may strip the screw head or the tool will slip and scar your hand.

I have heard of the practice of measuring pellet diameters but I'm not that concerned. Should I be???

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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 10:21 am 
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Joined: Thu Feb 02, 2006 11:35 pm
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Location: Alberta Canada
For any of my personal shoots or an AIR F/T shoot I have a small ammo box that always follows me.
Contents:
SAE Allen wrench set
Metric Allen wrench set
Set of calipers
6oz shorten handle ball peen hammer
6oz dead blow hammer shortened handle as well
3) steel punches 5/64" 7/64" & 5/32
2) brass punches 3/32" 5/32"
3) screw driver blade bits 1/8" 3/16" 1/4"
2) phillips drive bits #2 #3
1) roberts drive bit #2, screw driver handle
Small needle nose pliers
Small vise grips
Small adjustable wrench
Long set of tweezers
Tube oring lube
Roll of teflon tape
Assorted orings
Small tube of silicone oil.
Small (5 pce) diamond file set
Small rolls of emory cloth 320grt and 600grt
Assted scope shim stock
Dozen or so cleaning pellets soaked in Goo Gone in a small pill bottle.
Couple Zip loc sandwich bags for parts.

If I cant fix or tune any model with this, then its surgery time in the shop. :D Or if theres a heads up Spring compressor and such.

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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 4:21 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2009 1:27 am
Posts: 2514
Location: Vancouver
Though not really a general recommendation for every airgun hobbyist, I regard my TAIG mini lathe as essential. Without it there's no way I'd have done 1/10th of the modifications I have with various airguns. I bought the thing at Lee Valley Tools back in about 1993, specifically to enable making various parts for doublebasses (tuner parts, adjusting wheels for bridge height changes, endpin parts, various other work-related stuff), and out of gullibility bought the woodworking rests and related stuff as well as the metal working attachments like the milling block. Shouldn't have bothered, as any woodwork I do on it is vastly more precise with the metal stuff mounted. The lathe is tiny and lives on a little shelf under a storage shelf, so I work on it while seated on a low stool. As it turns out, making airgun parts on the thing is a breeze. Of course it'd be even more efficient on a full sized lathe, but I find making valve poppets, RVAs, various adapters and plugs, even hand-feeding threading taps and dies is all easy enough with this little gem. I rarely drill a hole on my drill press as the TAIG does a neater job.

Besides that, lots of Allen keys are handy. And a good selection of bolts and washers. Taps for threading holes... when the Chinese steel inevitably fails and a bolt spins free, after umpteen dismantlings and reassemblings of an airgun while dialing in the tune. Going one size bigger on the hardware becomes necessary when threads wear out, and has the bonus of providing more solid anchors for many airgun parts. Especially important for securing valve bodies in HPA applications.

A long bar vice is nice for work on springers. No need to make a spring vice if using a bar vice competently. I have a lightweight aluminum channel bar vice which does the job, decompressing and recompressing mainsprings neatly.

A selection of abrasives and files; various sandpapers and fine steel wool are important for deburring and polishing surfaces to improve consistency of operation of sliding parts. A lot of the cheaper stuff especially tends to have surface imperfections which can gall other parts and cause inconsistent velocities if involved in the power train. Valve surfaces need to be silky smooth to avoid leaks, so polishing there, even with brand new parts (or some would say ESPECIALLY with the new parts) can save a lot of headache. A Dremel with various diamond and other burrs for this sort of stuff is also handy, though hand files can do most jobs, just taking longer.


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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 7:30 pm 
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Location: New Brunswick
Wow, this thread has become informative.
Apparently I need to invest in more tools, maybe a TAIG mini lathe [emoji16]


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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 7:39 pm 
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Location: Calgary
Always good to have extra batteries at hand, for when you inevitably forget to turn off the red dot and find out the hard way when it refuses to turn on. Apparently no one is immune to this and has already caught me.

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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 9:49 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 25, 2014 9:16 pm
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Location: United States
I think the good fitting screwdrivers is a good one if you don't want to cosmetically damage screws. It always annoys me to have a nice clean whatever with damaged screw heads, and the nicer the toy, especially guns, I become exponentially irritated. Long ago I bought a screwdriver set specifically for firearms to avoid this problem, but the slotted bits are still tapered so kinda pointless. My fix is to buy cheapie screwdrivers and grind the tip to the correct thickness, width, parallel and rounded edges. Now I can remove/install without damage or even upsetting the bluing.
My tool collection is extensive so too much to list, but I think making custom tools is a great add. A fav is sandpaper on a stick; basically a wood dowel with sandpaper taped and wrapped around one end to make a roll, then chuck into a Dremel or drill to do whatever custom sanding needed, like the inside of a break barrel's receiver tube >1" down to a wee little transfer port of .120". Whatever grit and exactly whatever diameter needed to sand with the perfect pressure.
For weighing I have two cheapie scales, one is a tiny little gram/grain etc I use for pellets and up to ~12oz, the other is a luggage scale for trigger pull, cocking effort, weighing the whole gun etc. Both from ebay for ~5 or so ea, both digital, both verified as pretty accurate.
A cordless Dremel and a massive collection of bits is also a favorite of mine, especially diamond bits. A cool stone for burrs, beveling, sear work etc is a "Ruby Stone Crystal" nail file, or “Revlon Ceramic Stone Nail File" (same thing). Its very hard so it can do hardened steel. Nice knife/axe sharpener for field use too. Optionally you can wrap it with sandpaper if you want to extend its life or need a different grit. Or just use a similar shaped piece of metal wrapped with paper, even a small fine cut flat file works.
Misc tools can be made into other tools, like using the long end of an allen wrench to make punches of any size you need. Just chuck into a drill and grind/sand into what you need. They can also be made into chisels, or the custom slotted screwdriver blades I mentioned. And 1/4" allen fit into those 1/4" bit drivers. 1/4" bits of whatever shape can be modded into other tools. They are imo harder than allen wrenches so they can make nice center punches. Allen and 1/4" bits are hard enough to shatter fyi, so use safety glasses... Like if you lean on it until it snaps, or hit with a hammer, chips can splinter off and bury into your skin (or eye)! Hard to believe until I experienced it.
A random tool tip I'll mention because it seems nobody I know is aware of: With hacksaw blades; buy quality bi-metal (well worth the $), only use downward pressure in the cutting direction (reduces heat and rounding of cutting edge), never use so aggressively that the blade gets hot, and use oil on the teeth! Oil seems obvious if you think about it, but I guess few think about it? WD40 is certainly way better than nothing, but I use motor oil which is way better imo. Oil also smokes giving you an idea of the heat, which kills the cutting edge. Do it right and hacksaw blades will last like you never thought possible.


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PostPosted: Fri May 27, 2016 11:41 pm 
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Joined: Thu Feb 02, 2006 11:35 pm
Posts: 3099
Location: Alberta Canada
Whitewolf wrote:
For any of my personal shoots or an AIR F/T shoot I have a small ammo box that always follows me.
Contents:
SAE Allen wrench set
Metric Allen wrench set
Set of calipers
6oz shorten handle ball peen hammer
6oz dead blow hammer shortened handle as well
3) steel punches 5/64" 7/64" & 5/32
2) brass punches 3/32" 5/32"
3) screw driver blade bits 1/8" 3/16" 1/4"
2) phillips drive bits #2 #3
1) roberts drive bit #2, screw driver handle
Small needle nose pliers
Small vise grips
Small adjustable wrench
Long set of tweezers
Tube oring lube
Roll of teflon tape
Assorted orings
Small tube of silicone oil.
Small (5 pce) diamond file set
Small rolls of emory cloth 320grt and 600grt
Assted scope shim stock
Dozen or so cleaning pellets soaked in Goo Gone in a small pill bottle.
Couple Zip loc sandwich bags for parts.

If I cant fix or tune any model with this, then its surgery time in the shop. :D Or if theres a heads up Spring compressor and such.


This is just what comes along with me every time I shoot. And hax kept many shooters still smiling at a shoot. Otherwise as whats in my shop is quite extensive.
The shooters box carries the other goodies.

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