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 Post subject: Finish for ebony grips.
PostPosted: Fri May 05, 2017 8:54 pm 
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I've just received a pair of beautiful ebony grips for my 2240 and I was wondering if anyone here has any tips for what kind of finish works best for this wood/

I know a lot of people use tung oil or linseed oil but do you use these on their own or do you then apply some sort of varnish as well.

Any info will be greatly appreciated

Johnny


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PostPosted: Fri May 05, 2017 9:30 pm 
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Location: P.G. B.C.
Just the Tung oil, rubbed on very thin - just a couple drops here and there - let it dry 2 days between coats. The ebony is very hard and dense so will not absorb much oil, thus it may only take 3 coats to make you happy.

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PostPosted: Fri May 05, 2017 9:45 pm 
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And so once the tung oil is dry, nothing else needs to be done? Varnish or wax or anything?


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PostPosted: Fri May 05, 2017 9:48 pm 
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Once the Tung oil is hard, there is no further need for more finish, however a coat of some form of wax is used by some people on their guns.

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PostPosted: Fri May 05, 2017 10:47 pm 
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As Daryl pointed out Ebony is a very dense wood. To get Tung oil to absorb well, the wood needs to be conditioned. Warm in an oven at 150F for about 10 min. Rise under luke warm water. Wipe and let sit for 24hrs. This allows the pores to open up upon hard woods.
For your first Two Coats of Tung oil mix 50/50 with mineral spirits. The ultra thin oil will seep into the conditioned pours better. After your first 2 coats and at least 24hrs between. Then apply just Tung oil straight from the can. A couple coats with like Daryl said couple days dry time. Build your coats up to your desired look. Let set for a few days and a variety of automotive paste wax can be used to enhance your final look.

Enjoy.

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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2017 9:20 am 
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So would you need to give the wood a light sanding between coats? When I've varnished wood in the past it has needed a quick once over to keep the surface smooth.


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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2017 9:53 am 
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MisterJ wrote:
So would you need to give the wood a light sanding between coats? When I've varnished wood in the past it has needed a quick once over to keep the surface smooth.


IMHO that depends upon how your coats when on. If you see dust fuzzies or finger wiping lines then yes buff up with very a fine sandpaper, steel wool, synthetic buffing pads, or even heavy cotton from an old sweat shirt. Anything that will knock down high spots without removing too much wood and oil. The main purpose of the 50/50 mix is to seal the wood so that a smooth finish can be obtained with minimal to no sanding.
For achieving a very high gloss finish. The use of 400 and finer grit wet sandpaper with the oil sanding to make a mud will fill in the wood pores and build the finish up. Slow process and lots of elbow work but you can attain a mirror finish upon wood.
Big thing is take your time let each coat dry completely and you will alway get favourable results.

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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2017 10:47 am 
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This is a $79.00 Chinese rifle that I refinished with Tung oil. I've been using it for 30 years and dislike boiled linseed oil as it can yellow, turn rancid, and peel.

Depending on the wood, I'll use the same method Whitewolf described. In this case, very little effort went in to the refinishing, primarily because the Chinese wood (as usual) is probably from an old skid, had a few nail hole fills, and so on. Still, I'm happy enough considering how it looked initially.

Image

BEFORE

Image

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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2017 11:52 am 
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ITGUY wrote:
This is a $79.00 Chinese rifle that I refinished with Tung oil. I've been using it for 30 years and dislike boiled linseed oil as it can yellow, turn rancid, and peel.

Depending on the wood, I'll use the same method Whitewolf described. In this case, very little effort went in to the refinishing, primarily because the Chinese wood (as usual) is probably from an old skid, had a few nail hole fills, and so on. Still, I'm happy enough considering how it looked initially.

Image

BEFORE

Image



Wow, it's crazy how that ugly brown finish hid such beautiful wood. I'm really impressed.

Thanks for the great advice guys. I'm pretty excited to work on my grips. I will condition them today and maybe get a coat on tomorrow.

I'm assuming that the tung oil is just the standard tung oil the you can get from any hardware store. And that the application will be with a cloth instead of a brush.


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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2017 12:03 pm 
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I used a foam brush. Apply liberally. Leave applied for 15 minutes then wipe off excess with a lint free cloth. Let dry for 24 hours. Keep adding coats till you get the finish you want. Great advise about 50/50 mineral spirits for the first 2 coats. Circa 1850 Tung Oil is great stuff.

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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2017 12:20 pm 
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LoL I just noticed the ashtray...it has been 3 months, 5 days since my last smoke. 95 days....60 cigarettes a day...5700 smokes....285 packs...$3,705.00 LoL LoL

OK, anyway, yes it turned out OK for Chinese packing crate or skid wood didnt it? :) :)

Pure Tung oil from Minwax at Canadian Tire, or this stuff from Home Hardware.

Image

20 bucks a liter or something like that.
Oh, i use turps to cut it by the way

Oh yeah, you can also STAIN then seal with Tung oil if you want. Personally I dislike stains EXCEPT for the "natural" or clear ones. The stain will also go a long way way towards sealing the wood.

I use a brush for the initial slopping on as i dont care about bubbles or brush marks at that point...on bare wood you can almost "hear" the wood sucking it in anyway....later coats get put on with an old cotton tee shirt.

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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2017 12:41 pm 
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Good for you for quitting the smokes. I was a 30-a-day man myself until I quit 13 years ago now.

I was looking at that 1850 a few days ago at the local Home Hardware. I think I'll pop down there and pick some up. I don't think I'll use any stain on it because I really like the grain pattern on the wood.

Once again guys, thanks for the great advice. I will take some pictures and see if I can figure out how to post them.


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PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2017 1:11 pm 
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MisterJ wrote:
Good for you for quitting the smokes. I was a 30-a-day man myself until I quit 13 years ago now.

I was looking at that 1850 a few days ago at the local Home Hardware. I think I'll pop down there and pick some up. I don't think I'll use any stain on it because I really like the grain pattern on the wood.

Once again guys, thanks for the great advice. I will take some pictures and see if I can figure out how to post them.


Thanks. I really had no choice. My surgeon is a 5 foot tall, 95lb no nonsense woman that could probably stare down a grizzly.... and I got the distinct impression she was going to drop me as a patient and replace me with someone who "was taking things seriously" re: getting better.

Way to go on the 13 years!! A lot of folks dont know how difficult it really is, I.E. Once a smoker, ALWAYS a smoker....cant just have a couple at a party...

Photo's: Go to photobucket. Create an account, follow instructions, blah blah blah....when you have a photo uploaded to your "album" in photobucket, copy the direct link to it...come back here and press the Img (image} button. It will create the html code for you, then paste the url you previously copied form photobcket picture in the middle.

It sounds way more complicated than it really is...once you do it a few times, it will become a 15 second deal...

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Peter


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PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2017 12:33 am 
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Bit of a fan of the Cica 1850 products myself. I like their stains for beech and walnut- most of which are open-pored to begin with.
The 1850 walnut stain is a little green for my tastes. I overcoat with their cherry on a couple of quick wipe-on-off coats to correct the green. These stains are thin to begin with, and enhance the grain, rather than hide it.

I prefer matte finishes on gun wood. Birchwood-Casey stock wax makes a nice dull sheen for a final finish, and appears to be water proof.

Remember to seal the underside of your grips as well. It will prevent oil marking of the wood from contact with the gun.

-D.S.

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PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2017 8:34 am 
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Doc Sharptail wrote:
Bit of a fan of the Cica 1850 products myself. I like their stains for beech and walnut- most of which are open-pored to begin with.
The 1850 walnut stain is a little green for my tastes. I overcoat with their cherry on a couple of quick wipe-on-off coats to correct the green. These stains are thin to begin with, and enhance the grain, rather than hide it.

I prefer matte finishes on gun wood. Birchwood-Casey stock wax makes a nice dull sheen for a final finish, and appears to be water proof.

Remember to seal the underside of your grips as well. It will prevent oil marking of the wood from contact with the gun.

-D.S.


Thank you for the heads up on the 1850 stuff, good to know.

Excellent point on sealing hidden area'a...may I also remind people to seal all the inletting that will be hidden under the action, barrel, and so on.

Oh, another tip...always use a sanding block of course, BUT be CAUTIOUS around the butt pad area..if you take off too much while sanding then the butt pad will have overhang around the the edges of the stock..and the only way to fix that PROPERLY is to re-install the butt pad, protect the stock with couple wraps of painters tape, put a mildly abraisive wheel on your bench grinder and re-profile the butt pad to match the stock contour....NOT fun as it creates a miserable rubber dust.

Image

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