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PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 4:51 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2017 8:13 am
Posts: 156
If you're using your scope's focus to determine range, I assumed you would (a) focus your scope and then (b) check the distance markings. However, I saw a video clip from a field target shooter who would pre-focus his scope at a certain distance, and then use the clarity of the image/crosshairs to determine the range.

First question, is this pre-focus, single distance method common?

Second question, what would you consider the minimum magnification/objective ratio to be able to effectively range-find with a scope?

I've got a Hawke Airmax 4-12x40 that suits me just fine (my CentrePoint 4-16x40 is sitting in a box), but I don't think 12x40mm has the depth of field for me or my eyes to really use it for ranging, I'd constantly be second-guessing the focus.

Third question, if using this "pre-focus" method, is there a distance that works best?

For instance, if an airgun is zero'd at 12 and 28 yards, and you shoot 10-50 yards, is there distance that would be optimal to focus the scope to? If I focused the scope around 28 yards, and my PBR extended to 31 yards, I figure the focus should fall off about the same place as my trajectory, giving me an idea of where to begin holdover. For small game hunting, I don't have the interest/accuracy to shoot beyond 30 yards, so ranges beyond the focus could in theory be rejected quickly.

Just curious in general about other's thoughts on this.

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Stoeger X3 .177, UTG 3-9x40 - 5.5 fpe
Crosman Shockwave NP .22, Hawke Airmax 4-12x40 - 16 fpe
Pumper Project .22, Centrepoint 4-16x40 - 13 fpe


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2018 7:25 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2011 12:35 pm
Posts: 5884
Location: P.G. B.C.
Some scopes have a fine enough adjustment - (LARGER PARALAX/FOCUS WHEEL HELPS) to accurately determine range.

The cheaper the scope, the less likely it is of use.

I found my 4200 6-24X Bushnell Elite scope was good enough in the gopher patch, but that was with a flat shooting CF rifle and

25 yards error over 400 to 600yard ranges was not that important, not like in air gun shooting FT where 2 or 3 yards error might be a miss on a 1/2" aiming spot.

A range finder is better than using a scope, but one of the $500.00 PLUS HAWKE or Optisan scopes should suffice.

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Best Wishes
Daryl


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