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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 5:51 pm 
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Location: Nova Scotia
So I was out this morning and decided to pump my air rifle up to it's maximum ten pumps. It was louder than I remembered it being (it's a detuned 2289 Crosman backpacker for the Canadian market). Normally I can't hear my neighbours as they are hundreds of yards away but I did hear someone say "that sounds like someone shooting". I stopped right then and there because I didn't want to draw any attention to myself. That got me thinking that it was time to call around to see if there's been any changes to any laws or bylaws since I last checked 8 years ago.

I called the RCMP and was told they did not know and was advised to call the Chief firearms officer in NS. They told me they hadn't heard of any issue with firing a sub 500fps pellet gun and if the RCMP weren't aware of any law then it SHOULD be okay to shoot. I hate it when someone answers in anything less than a definite term.

I decided to contact safety services NS located in burnside. That's where I was supposed to take my non restricted course before COVID-19 struck. I figured since they taught the safety course they would have some idea about airgun safety and shooting. Nope. Couldn't help me at all.

So I decided to call the Halifax Police Department. The officer spent quite a bit of time looking things up for me. Basically he said he couldn't find anything directly that said I couldn't do it, but also couldn't find anything that said I could do it either. He also stated that if someone reported hearing "shots" then I might have the swat team show up at my house unexpectedly. At that time it's possible that I could be charged but wouldn't say with what or even if it was definite. He also said if my pellet went anywhere that it wasn't supposed to (like a child trespassing on my property or an unfortunate ricochet) and that caused any bodily harm then again, I could be charged. Kind of scary but I pointed out I have about 500M of forest behind me and no neighbours with children. I also shoot from an elevated position so any stray pellet would never travel more than 30m from the end of my barrel. Basically said do it at your own risk but advised that "he wouldn't do it".

Didn't love his answer and it still really didn't answer my question so I contacted 311 and asked for their bylaw enforcement division. I'm awaiting a call back but the lady who answered told me she has an aunt that uses a pellet gun to shoot squirrels in her backyard in the city and would be very surprised if it's a problem.

Still, not really any further ahead I decided to call the Department of Natural Resources. It'd be suggested that shooting in my backyard might somehow fall under the jurisdiction of the wildlife act. Not sure how as again, a sub 500fps pellet gun is not classified as a firearm. I'm also not hunting, unless you count the metal animal silhouette targets that I shoot in my backyard. Anyways, still awaiting a call from them.

My neighbours are moving at the end of this week but I think it might be prudent for me to tell the new neighbours that I shoot a pellet gun and if they hear anything that they think might be a gun it's probably just me shooting my qb78.

Anyone else living in Nova Scotia on this forum that's looked further into the implications/legality of shooting a pellet rifle in their backyard? Anyone ever have the cops come by questioning a noise complaint? I really don't want to do anything that could be illegal but it seems like nobody really knows or is willing to say if it's legal or not. My own interpretation of the legislation makes it seem to me that I'm well within my rights but I'm sort of biased and the halifax police officer pointed out that a lawyer could introduce doubt in just about any argument whatsoever for or against shooting in my backyard.

As for what my shooting set up is like- I'm shooting from my deck which is enclosed with a privacy fence on all sides (it's a pool deck). It's elevated and my back yard falls off for about 30 m and then levels out for the next 500m. My pellets don't go past 30 m when shooting downwards from the deck unless I for some reason decided to try and go for distance rather than shooting at my targets. I'm surrounded by trees on all sides of my backyard. My house and deck obscure anyone seeing from the front. I imagine that the fencing likely blocks the sound travelling towards the street quite a bit. I have a backstop for the bulk of my targets. The only one that doesn't would be the tin cans I've tied up in the trees in my backyard. These would be tied at about 8-10 feet below the shooting height (so I'm still shooting down) and are about 20 meters away from the end of my barrel. I think I've done a pretty good job of setting up a "reasonable and prudent" range when it comes to taking safety into account. What do you think? Fire away but keep things quiet and out of sight? Find a proper range to go to? Give up on pellet rifles and start shooting at a range with a bona fide firearm?

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 6:15 pm 
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Location: Kingston, ON
Sorry, you can't do it!
viewtopic.php?t=28045&start=

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 6:17 pm 
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Location: Somewheres near the Atlantic
Yeah I'm waiting on new neighbors to move in. There been a sold sign on it for over a week, and haven't seen anyone. You could make a range silencer. Basically a padded box you insert the muzzle and shoot from ( not attached to the gun ). I don't have a permanent shooting range in my back yard. Take it down every time I'm done.

As far as I heard. As long as there isn't a bylaw stating you cannot discharge airguns and you are dong it safely. Doubt the police will bother. They have to visit if someone complains. Well talking to a buddy that on the Exc member list of a local shooting club. He doesn't think it will be open for a few more months. If I'm traveling to a range, I'm not gonna be shooting airguns.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 6:22 pm 
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Dukemeister wrote:
Sorry, you can't do it!
viewtopic.php?t=28045&start=


Believe that outdated. Used to be a Bylaw preventing the sale and storage of airguns In Halifax. Which I think is the one that person is quoting from the 60s. When I searched a couple years ago, couldn't find it anymore.

Quote:
Air Guns in HRM By John Fraser, Halifax Wildlife Association

April 11, 2013



Do you believe that you have a good understanding of the laws and regulations that apply to the use of air guns in the HRM? You may be surprised to learn about the many changes that have taken place in the past few years.



Some folks believe that you are not allowed to own an air gun in HRM. Not true. Some may believe that you are not permitted to use an air gun in HRM. Again, not true. Some may believe that air guns are treated just like a firearm. In fact this is partially true as air gun use in HRM now falls under the Firearms Act.



Prior to amalgamation of Halifax, Dartmouth, Bedford and the County of Halifax into the Halifax Regional Municipality, each of the former municipalities had their own municipal ordinances and by-laws that regulated the use of air guns in one way or another:



Former City of Halifax

Ordinance 159 – Discharge of Guns and Other Firearms



Former City of Dartmouth

By-Law A-300 – Air Guns and Rifles

By-Law F-300 – Firearms



Former Town of Bedford

By-Law 22141 – Discharge of Firearms



Former County

Section 5 & 5A – Air Guns and Sling Shots

Section 6 – Firearms



If you were a resident of one of these areas you may have had some knowledge of the applicable laws of the day. However, following amalgamation a By-Law Rationalization Working Group recommended in a staff report dated December 28, 2005 (http://halifax.ca/co...00Nuisances.pdf ) that a new By-Law N-300, Respecting Nuisances be approved. The Council meeting of August 7, 2007 passed the new By-Law (http://halifax.ca/co.../070807ca93.pdf) thereby repealing all previous municipal by-laws that dealt with the discharge of firearms and the possession, use and sale of air rifles and pellet guns. The new by-law essentially repealed all of the above bylaws and ordinances and replaced it with … nothing.



Why nothing? Well, apparently HRM Council accepted a recommendation from the HRM police that the Criminal Code of Canada, and the Nova Scotia Wildlife Act together gave them all the authority that they needed to adequately deal with any issues that might surface in regards to the use of air guns in the municipality.



The major problem seems to be that very little information about this decision by Council got out to either the public or the policing authorities in HRM. A call by this writer to the HRM police department office to enquire about the rules that must be followed respecting air guns was met with a response that it is the position of the HRM Police that all BB guns and air guns are illegal to purchase or possess in HRM and they can be confiscated by police and the possessor charged.



When pressured to provide the governing laws upon which this position was based I was referred to a more senior officer who reiterated the earlier position that air guns are illegal in HRM and will be confiscated. When I pointed out that municipal bylaws regarding air guns had been repealed, the officer had no knowledge of that fact and felt that in any case the police were instead enforcing provincial regulations. But when pressured, the officer was unable to quote the relevant regulations giving them that authority.



After some more enquiries I was referred to police Superintendent Falkenham, officer-in-charge of Integrated Emergency Services (IES), who in turn referred me to Sergeant Tim Moser, police coordinator with the Provincial Firearms Office. Sgt. Moser offered a number of clarifications of what laws govern policing of air guns in HRM and indicated that there remain some grey areas. He also indicted that he regularly has had to advise police officers to return air guns that they had seized under Bylaw provisions that no longer exist and to drop the associated charges.



Both the Criminal Code of Canada and the Federal Firearms Legislation govern the possession and use of air guns in HRM. There is a great deal of difference in treatment under these laws based on whether the matter is a simple possession offence or a use offence for which charges are being brought forward. Very helpful information on the treatment of air guns can be found on the RCMP website at: http://www.rcmp-grc....rme_air-eng.htm.



Basically, air guns with both a high muzzle velocity (greater than 152.4 meters or 500 feet per second) and a high muzzle energy (greater than 5.7 joules or 4.2 foot-pounds) – generally known as high-powered air guns – are treated as firearms for purposes of both the Firearms Act and the Criminal Code. The owner must meet the same firearms training and licensing requirements (POL; PAL) as for a conventional firearm and are also required to store, transport, display and handle them safely in accordance with the regulations supporting the Firearms Act. High-powered air rifles are classified as non-restricted firearms. High-powered air pistols are classified as restricted if their barrel is longer than 105 mm or prohibited if their barrel length is 105 mm or less.



Air guns with a maximum muzzle velocity of 152.4 meters or 500 feet per second and/or a maximum muzzle energy of 5.7 joules or 4.2 foot pounds are deemed under most circumstances to not be firearms and therefore are exempt from licensing, registration, and other requirements under the Firearms Act, and from penalties set out in the Criminal Code for possessing a firearm without a valid licence or registration certificate. However, they are considered to be firearms under the Criminal Code if they are used to commit a crime. Further, the Criminal Code requires that reasonable precautions be taken to use, carry, handle, store, transport, and ship them in a safe and secure manner.



You should be aware that air guns that are not powerful enough to cause serious injury or death, but that were designed to resemble a real firearm with near precision are known as replica firearms. Replica firearms, except for replicas of antique firearms, are classified as prohibited devices, meaning that as an individual, you cannot import or acquire a replica firearm. You may keep any that you owned on December 1, 1998. You do not need a licence to possess them and they do not need to be registered. If you take a replica firearm out of Canada, you will not be able to bring it back in. Many Airsoft guns that are commonly available are highly detailed replicas of real lethal weapons and fall into this prohibited category.



Air guns that are not powerful enough to be classified as firearms and that do not resemble a real firearm closely enough to be considered a replica (an example would be a harmless air gun made out of clear plastic or a device that is obviously a child’s toy) generally fall within the definition of an “imitation firearm”. They are, however, subject to some penalties under the Criminal Code if used to commit a crime. Also, you need to be aware of the pigs eye criteria.



Tests carried out by the Forensic Laboratory Services-Firearms Section, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, in Regina, Saskatchewan, have established minimum velocity necessary for nonconventional projectiles to penetrate the eye – something known as the pig eye criteria based on the material used in tests that were performed.



To satisfy the Criminal Code of Canada’s definition of a firearm, a barreled weapon must be capable of causing serious bodily injury or death to a person. Canadian courts have accepted the forensically established criteria of “penetration or rupture of an eye” as serious bodily injury. The minimal velocity of nonconventional ammunition required to penetrate the eye, including airsoft projectiles, had not previously been established. To establish the minimal threshold requirements for eye penetration, empirical tests were conducted using a variety of airsoft projectiles. Using the data obtained from these tests, and previous research using “air gun” projectiles, an “energy density” parameter was calculated for the minimum penetration threshold of an eye. Airsoft guns capable of achieving velocities in excess of 99 m/s (325 ft/s) using conventional 6-mm airsoft ammunition will satisfy the forensically established criteria of “serious bodily injury”, meaning they are considered firearms. The energy density parameter for typical 6-mm plastic airsoft projectiles is 4.3 to 4.8 J/cm². This calculation also encompasses 4.5-mm steel BBs such as are fired from typical BB guns.



In conclusion, you can own and use air guns within HRM but you should do so with a clear understanding of all the rules that govern them. Federal Firearms Act and Criminal Code rules have been discussed above, but in addition you should pay attention to the NS Wildlife Act and Regulations made under that act in respect to when, where and how you use your air gun. Finally, always use your air gun with the highest degree of safety in mind. Should an air gun – even one that is not high powered – cause a serious injury (such as eye damage) then the matter will be treated as a firearms related incident under the Criminal Code


Last edited by leadslinger on Wed Apr 29, 2020 6:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 6:24 pm 
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Location: Nova Scotia
Dukemeister wrote:
Sorry, you can't do it!
viewtopic.php?t=28045&start=

Looking down at the bottom of that thread it says that the bylaw seciton on airguns had been removed from the bylaws way back in 2007.

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 6:33 pm 
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Location: Kingston, ON
Sweet! usually it's a stupid By-law that prohibits shooting with anything within city/town limits. It's one reason I moved out of Kingston city limits back in 2010.Holy crap, it's been 10 yrs since I moved, feels like 2. Old age is hell! :shock:

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 6:40 pm 
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Location: Somewheres near the Atlantic
Dukemeister wrote:
Sweet! usually it's a stupid By-law that prohibits shooting with anything within city/town limits. It's one reason I moved out of Kingston city limits back in 2010.Holy crap, it's been 10 yrs since I moved, feels like 2. Old age is hell! :shock:


Nothing stopped me shooting airguns in the city limits. I live in rural NS now. I'm just a little worried that the person that may be moving next door is a city slicker. Smart Cars don't belong out here. Seen one parked next door, when there was some people doing a house inspection.


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 6:43 pm 
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Location: P.G. B.C.
Duke - it's not for the weak!

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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:06 pm 
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Daryl wrote:
Duke - it's not for the weak!


X2 - Whoever coined the term "Golden Years" didn't know what they were talking about - LOL!


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:15 pm 
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"The golden Years are here at Last"
"The Golden Years can Kiss My A--"

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PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2020 8:48 pm 
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Location: P.G. B.C.
In that list leadslinger posted, I found this sentence interesting. It is just 'waiting' to catch someone THEY want to make an example of.

"Many Airsoft guns that are commonly available are highly detailed replicas of real lethal weapons and fall into this prohibited category."

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PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2020 3:59 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2006 5:50 pm
Posts: 772
Location: Nova Scotia
Being a resident of HRM, in a similar situation.. Where can I shoot an air rifle.The only thing I can find , taken from the 2019 Hunting regulations. Note some paragraphs state weapon, others firearm. States you must have PAL to hunt with firearm, so is a sub 500 rifle a "firearm"?Maybe Para 8 is what you are looking for, if you have a good sized property

6. No person shall at any time discharge any weapon:
• within or across the travelled portion of any highway, or within
30 m of the boundary of any highway; or
• between one-half hour after sunset and one-half hour before
sunrise the following day (refer to page 114).
7. No person shall at any time:
• hunt, take or kill, or attempt to hunt, take or kill wildlife with a
weapon or discharge a weapon within 804 m of a school;
• discharge a firearm loaded with a rifle cartridge, single ball,
or slug within 402 m of a dwelling, playground, golf course,
athletic field, woods operation, place of business, agricultural
building, or public building other than a school;
• discharge a shotgun loaded with shot, a crossbow or a bow
within 182 m of a dwelling, playground, golf course, athletic
field, woods operation, place of business, agricultural building,
or public building other than a school;
• hunt, take or kill, or attempt to hunt, take or kill wildlife that is
within 182 m of a dwelling, playground, golf course, athletic
field, woods operation, place of business, agricultural building,
or public building other than a school.
8. The owner or occupier of a dwelling or person authorized by the
owner or occupier who holds a valid licence may discharge a
weapon, or hunt, take or kill wildlife within the distances stated if the
point of discharge is not within the above prescribed distances of:
• any other dwelling; or
• a school, agricultural or public building, playground, golf
course, athletic field, woods operation, or place of business


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PostPosted: Fri May 01, 2020 4:15 pm 
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Location: Nova Scotia
Here's a link to NS bylaws Munincipalities listed.. Only thing for HRM that I see is having firearms, bows etc in parks

https://www.novascotia.ca/just/regulati ... ooklet.pdf


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PostPosted: Sat May 02, 2020 3:51 pm 
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Posts: 97
Location: Mississauga , ON. Canada
If anyone would like to know the answer you can call me. They had told me this was my 20th Police Response to my home because of a man with gun call.
So, I can tell you how to be safe and legal. I have always been a member here. Sniper Dan knows who I am among others too. I worked many years for the Police. I did undercover assignments and special operations. ( life threatened twice ) I also worked for trouble shooting operations ( special attention to certain groups ) . I'm 53 years old and my fondness memories of working with the Detectives and Police personal was how down too earth and how much common sense they all displayed. I was asked to teach pistol shooting to the police when I was 16. I grew up with a top Toronto undercover detective. The RCMP is friendly and very co-operative to good people. Thank God for that. I like the new guy.
Remembering these following staples is better than an answer to you though, My Cell 437-224-4134 Lou .
Like Safety first ( a better than good back Stop ) , No Noise what's so ever. Or, very very low noise ( It will piss off and confuse Officers who will have to shoot you if things go south) , Under 500 fps helps ... but not really at all. ( Call for that explanation ) , permission from neighbors was always a bi law rule sort of , have no attention to you at all times ( inside a garage, deep in your back yard outside of city limits etc. not out a window or in the public's eye. Shots only downward to the ground. Finally , It's all illegal in a City Metropolis ****. By Laws . So what is the point ? You're simply not allowed. When the Police get called it's too late. It's on your record. The police themselves have pellet guns too. They follow those staples I indicated above. To recap , Sling Shots, air Soft , arrows, rocks , golph balls etc. .... all carry the same charges when you do something stupid. The people here should all read this, so they don't get 20 visits because today it just takes 1 or 2 visits and they take everything and jail time guys. So no need to worrying about 2240 barrel lengths and FPE VS FPS and just focus on this ... They are all dangerous Air Soft Too . So just be Smart and don't do anything stupid. Re frame from bringing attention to the sport with all the whats legal jargon. *** It's very negative for our sport and hobby. All that matters is that no one gets hurt. That means , Profile all the air gunners and such before sharing information about tuning and or selling to individuals even replicas. I turned many buyers down in my day. Just didn't like their demeanor.
Hope this helps. I figure I am helping by telling everyone this. So that way even if someone breaks the law, maybe they can still be Safe and not hurt anyone. I also hope I am still liked here.
Captain Air lol


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